Webzine – Number 3
French gastronomy

“Between tradition and innovation“

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic

French gastronomy was born in a particular context and evolves according to the society in which it lives. Its entry on to UNESCO’s world heritage list confirmed its universal value and will help immortalise the French art of living. The golden age of French gastronomy was between the 19th and 20th centuries. Cuisine reached a level of complexity that had never been attained before. It became more precise, more rational. JP Poulain even spoke of “culinary science”. Its procedures were meticulously recorded in written works, and cooks began talking about a language that had to be respected.

This is when cooks became, for dozens of years, “artisans” rather than “artists”. They no longer created, they interpreted. This codified cuisine later became known as “classic cuisine”. Today, chefs distinguish themselves by the way they innovate and through the sources of their inspiration. Gastronomy, then, is evolving through a trend in which the cook is free, bound by no rules or limitations.We are in the midst, then, of a process of reinterpreting gastronomic traditions on the basis of chefs’ experiences, sensitivity and exposure to the world.Beyond this gastronomic culture, chefs are also creating a new vision of personal worlds, and bodies of values that form them.Many sources of inspiration derive from chefs’ childhoods, homelands and the dishes they ate with their families when then they were younger. Most have now expanded their culture in terms of products, techniques and culinary traditions to cover other countries thanks to travelling and meeting other people.

lescuyer-properties-thierry-marx-french-cuisine

Tradition plays a highly important role in innovation. Every artist must have a classical grounding before daring to venture off on an original creation. You must gain knowledge and a technique before being able to technically articulate your ideas.

lescuyer-properties-jean-robert-pitte-magazine-gusto-bocuse-exquisite-flavour

Furthermore, a successful innovation by a chef can make such a lasting impression on minds that it eventually becomes a tradition. Sometimes a target of jealousy, French gastronomy remains the “calm force” that, being backed up a rich heritage and undeniable savoir-faire, knows how to exist, how to excel and how to renew itself.

In this edition we have the pleasure of meeting Laurent Deverlanges, CEO of Caviar De Neuvic, a rare French pearl that is shaking up the strictures of a sector by blending innovation with deep respect for the ancestral tradition of producing exceptional caviar.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-packaging

AD/ Nowadays caviar is not associated with a French product, so how have you managed to thrive in a market featuring the biggest international names?

L. Deverlanges :
There are not many big international names when it comes to caviar at the moment. The best known brands are Petrossian and Prunier, which are both French. So the French have a strong hand to play in the caviar market.

AD/ Is there a genuine caviar tradition rooted in French heritage?

L. Deverlanges :
Eating caviar is not as rooted in French heritage as it may be in Russian tradition, but France played a leading role in developing the renown of a product that was just a festive dish that the so-called “White Russians” took with them when they fled to Paris in the 1920s. Caviar owes its prestigious reputation to the meeting of these immigrants and the Paris of les années folles. That is why France is now the No1 consumer of caviar outside Russia and has become the fulcrum of the world caviar trade. More recently, the French were the first to develop sturgeon farming to tackle the threat of the extinction of our Atlantic sturgeon. The first farmed caviar products came from France as far back as 1994, at a time when the rest of the world was focused on fishing and Caspian Sea resources seemed inexhaustible.
Lastly, it should be remembered that sturgeon has existed in France for a long time, since our Cro-Magnon ancestors in the south-west used to eat it.

AD/ Caviar De Neuvic has a modern, sleek identity far removed from the cliched ostentatiousness with which caviar is often linked, do you have a real desire to break away from that old view?

L. Deverlanges :
There are now very few of the old sort of consumers of wild caviar left. We are geared towards a new clientele, food lovers who are looking for an exceptional, healthy and tasty product that they can share with friends. We created the Caviar de Neuvic recently in a bid to represent what we are: a young, modern and genuine company. We hope that the brand reflects the product in the can.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-packaging-ensemble

AD/ What is so special about Caviar De Neuvic?

L. Deverlanges :
It is fresh caviar free from any extraneous taste and produced from sturgeon farmed in France in optimal conditions, i.e. low density, quality water, quality food and respect for the fish. Mostly the caviar is made from Siberian sturgeon, meaning it has an excellent buttery and dried fruit taste.

AD/ What is your position with regard to sustainable development?

L. Deverlanges :
Caviar is a natural product. We believe that you cannot make a natural product without respecting nature. We are, first and foremost, farmers and nature is our most important partner. We have always taken great care to control the quality of our discharges, process our waste and provide our fish with appropriate living and feeding conditions. Our feed consists solely of GM-free cereals and sustainably-fished fish meal. We are currently working with our suppliers to see whether we can introduce 100% Organic feeding.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-productuion-tradition

p style=”text-align: left;”>AD/ At the moment 90% of your output is for the French market. How does caviar fit into the French art of living?

L. Deverlanges :
Exports account for only 10% of our output this year but we hope that that figure will reach 50% when we hit cruising speed. France is an important market for caviar, with a new population of food-loving hedonists who like hosting and sharing good meals with friends. Furthermore, caviar has already become a features of many households’ tables for meals marking important events, while in some restaurants it has become part of Saint Valentine’s Day meals. We hope that it will soon become integral to many other special occasions.

AD/ And to gastronomy?

L. Deverlanges :
Caviar is a dish in its own right and can go either with the most simple recipes, such as mashed potato with caviar, or the most complex ones concocted by Michelin star chefs. What is more, it can be used as an ingredient or as part of a mixture, as in the caviar butter that we market, which can be eaten on bread fingers with an egg, fish or oysters.

AD/ How have you been received abroad?

L. Deverlanges :
As ever, France has an excellent image abroad, particularly when it comes to luxury products and gastronomy. Our foreign distributors or clients are attracted by the brand, with its simple design, and then convinced by the product, with its very accessible taste, not too salty and without a fishy flavour.

AD/ Caviar is an exceptional product, was there really a need to get backs to the essence of the product, with a pure, unpretentious taste?

L. Deverlanges :
Unfortunately caviar is not a product that benefits from a lot of happy connotations when it comes to convincing new consumers. There is constant talk about its exorbitant price per kilo, so it should also be mentioned that a 30g tin can be bought for between €30 and €70 depending on the brands and the distribution channel, and that makes it quite accessible to the majority of households who wish to mark a special occasion. Similarly, caviar is forever being linked with a whole slew of Russian or Persian rituals, creating the impression that it is reserved for a small circle of initiated people. Lastly, the act of purchasing caviar is often complicated by misleading the consumer about the source or by adding qualifiers that mean nothing to new clients. We created our brand so as to make things easy for people to understand, removing the notion of sacredness from the act of eating caviar and explaining to sellers the basic principles for describing the product to customers to help them consume it.

AD/ What is the best way to savour Caviar De Neuvic?

L. Deverlanges :
All ways are good, and everyone will find their own favourite. We recommend that first-time consumers should simply taste the caviar with a spoon while sharing a can with friends. After that, you can eat it as an accompaniment to a straight-forward meal such as a scallop carpaccio or a boiled egg. Enthusiasts eat it in the same way, usually with bigger cans.

AD/ Do you intend to open your own stores and eateries in France?

L. Deverlanges :
We work mainly with a network of gourmet outlets, wine cellars and restaurants. We regularly open short-lived stores during times of high consumption. Moreover, we are currently looking for premises in Paris to set up a delivery and collection outlet for our clients, and also a point of sale.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic

French gastronomy was born in a particular context and evolves according to the society in which it lives. Its entry on to UNESCO’s world heritage list confirmed its universal value and will help immortalise the French art of living. The golden age of French gastronomy was between the 19th and 20th centuries. Cuisine reached a level of complexity that had never been attained before. It became more precise, more rational. JP Poulain even spoke of “culinary science”. Its procedures were meticulously recorded in written works, and cooks began talking about a language that had to be respected.

This is when cooks became, for dozens of years, “artisans” rather than “artists”. They no longer created, they interpreted. This codified cuisine later became known as “classic cuisine”. Today, chefs distinguish themselves by the way they innovate and through the sources of their inspiration. Gastronomy, then, is evolving through a trend in which the cook is free, bound by no rules or limitations.We are in the midst, then, of a process of reinterpreting gastronomic traditions on the basis of chefs’ experiences, sensitivity and exposure to the world.Beyond this gastronomic culture, chefs are also creating a new vision of personal worlds, and bodies of values that form them.Many sources of inspiration derive from chefs’ childhoods, homelands and the dishes they ate with their families when then they were younger. Most have now expanded their culture in terms of products, techniques and culinary traditions to cover other countries thanks to travelling and meeting other people.


lescuyer-properties-thierry-marx-mobile_en

Tradition plays a highly important role in innovation. Every artist must have a classical grounding before daring to venture off on an original creation. You must gain knowledge and a technique before being able to technically articulate your ideas.

lescuyer-properties-bocuse-jean-robert-pitte-mobile_en

Furthermore, a successful innovation by a chef can make such a lasting impression on minds that it eventually becomes a tradition. Sometimes a target of jealousy, French gastronomy remains the “calm force” that, being backed up a rich heritage and undeniable savoir-faire, knows how to exist, how to excel and how to renew itself.

In this edition we have the pleasure of meeting Laurent Deverlanges, CEO of Caviar De Neuvic, a rare French pearl that is shaking up the strictures of a sector by blending innovation with deep respect for the ancestral tradition of producing exceptional caviar.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-packaging

AD/ Nowadays caviar is not associated with a French product, so how have you managed to thrive in a market featuring the biggest international names?

L. Deverlanges : There are not many big international names when it comes to caviar at the moment. The best known brands are Petrossian and Prunier, which are both French. So the French have a strong hand to play in the caviar market.

AD/ Is there a genuine caviar tradition rooted in French heritage?

L. Deverlanges : Eating caviar is not as rooted in French heritage as it may be in Russian tradition, but France played a leading role in developing the renown of a product that was just a festive dish that the so-called “White Russians” took with them when they fled to Paris in the 1920s. Caviar owes its prestigious reputation to the meeting of these immigrants and the Paris of les années folles. That is why France is now the No1 consumer of caviar outside Russia and has become the fulcrum of the world caviar trade. More recently, the French were the first to develop sturgeon farming to tackle the threat of the extinction of our Atlantic sturgeon. The first farmed caviar products came from France as far back as 1994, at a time when the rest of the world was focused on fishing and Caspian Sea resources seemed inexhaustible.
Lastly, it should be remembered that sturgeon has existed in France for a long time, since our Cro-Magnon ancestors in the south-west used to eat it.

AD/ Caviar De Neuvic has a modern, sleek identity far removed from the cliched ostentatiousness with which caviar is often linked, do you have a real desire to break away from that old view?

L. Deverlanges : There are now very few of the old sort of consumers of wild caviar left. We are geared towards a new clientele, food lovers who are looking for an exceptional, healthy and tasty product that they can share with friends. We created the Caviar de Neuvic recently in a bid to represent what we are: a young, modern and genuine company. We hope that the brand reflects the product in the can.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-packaging-ensemble

AD/ What is so special about Caviar De Neuvic?

L. Deverlanges : It is fresh caviar free from any extraneous taste and produced from sturgeon farmed in France in optimal conditions, i.e. low density, quality water, quality food and respect for the fish. Mostly the caviar is made from Siberian sturgeon, meaning it has an excellent buttery and dried fruit taste.

AD/ What is your position with regard to sustainable development?

L. Deverlanges : Caviar is a natural product. We believe that you cannot make a natural product without respecting nature. We are, first and foremost, farmers and nature is our most important partner. We have always taken great care to control the quality of our discharges, process our waste and provide our fish with appropriate living and feeding conditions. Our feed consists solely of GM-free cereals and sustainably-fished fish meal. We are currently working with our suppliers to see whether we can introduce 100% Organic feeding.

lescuyer-properties-caviar-de-neuvic-productuion-tradition

p style=”text-align: left;”>AD/ At the moment 90% of your output is for the French market. How does caviar fit into the French art of living? L. Deverlanges : Exports account for only 10% of our output this year but we hope that that figure will reach 50% when we hit cruising speed. France is an important market for caviar, with a new population of food-loving hedonists who like hosting and sharing good meals with friends. Furthermore, caviar has already become a features of many households’ tables for meals marking important events, while in some restaurants it has become part of Saint Valentine’s Day meals. We hope that it will soon become integral to many other special occasions.

AD/ And to gastronomy?

L. Deverlanges : Caviar is a dish in its own right and can go either with the most simple recipes, such as mashed potato with caviar, or the most complex ones concocted by Michelin star chefs. What is more, it can be used as an ingredient or as part of a mixture, as in the caviar butter that we market, which can be eaten on bread fingers with an egg, fish or oysters.

AD/ How have you been received abroad?

L. Deverlanges : As ever, France has an excellent image abroad, particularly when it comes to luxury products and gastronomy. Our foreign distributors or clients are attracted by the brand, with its simple design, and then convinced by the product, with its very accessible taste, not too salty and without a fishy flavour.

AD/ Caviar is an exceptional product, was there really a need to get backs to the essence of the product, with a pure, unpretentious taste?

L. Deverlanges : Unfortunately caviar is not a product that benefits from a lot of happy connotations when it comes to convincing new consumers. There is constant talk about its exorbitant price per kilo, so it should also be mentioned that a 30g tin can be bought for between €30 and €70 depending on the brands and the distribution channel, and that makes it quite accessible to the majority of households who wish to mark a special occasion. Similarly, caviar is forever being linked with a whole slew of Russian or Persian rituals, creating the impression that it is reserved for a small circle of initiated people. Lastly, the act of purchasing caviar is often complicated by misleading the consumer about the source or by adding qualifiers that mean nothing to new clients. We created our brand so as to make things easy for people to understand, removing the notion of sacredness from the act of eating caviar and explaining to sellers the basic principles for describing the product to customers to help them consume it.

AD/ What is the best way to savour Caviar De Neuvic?

L. Deverlanges : All ways are good, and everyone will find their own favourite. We recommend that first-time consumers should simply taste the caviar with a spoon while sharing a can with friends. After that, you can eat it as an accompaniment to a straight-forward meal such as a scallop carpaccio or a boiled egg. Enthusiasts eat it in the same way, usually with bigger cans.

AD/ Do you intend to open your own stores and eateries in France?

L. Deverlanges : We work mainly with a network of gourmet outlets, wine cellars and restaurants. We regularly open short-lived stores during times of high consumption. Moreover, we are currently looking for premises in Paris to set up a delivery and collection outlet for our clients, and also a point of sale.

Aristide Douroux
Editor At Large

Source Photos et Film : De Neuvic®
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